How may types of fishing artificial lure? How to differentiate them?

I am new to fishing but how do i differentiate between those fishing lures? the are few of them but i cant seems to differentiate them especially the ones that looks like fish. Poppers….jiggs…n etc.

Powered by http://answers.yahoo.com

6 thoughts on “How may types of fishing artificial lure? How to differentiate them?

  1. Top water, crank, jigging, fly, trolling would be ones that come to mind for me.

  2. IT TAKES TIME ON THE WATER, YOU WILL BECOME MORE FAMILIAR WITH THEM AS YOU USE THEM, TRY THEM ALL AND SEE WHAT THEY DO, WHAT THEIR ACTION IS AND HOW TO FISH THEM, TRY EACH ONE EVERY TIME YOU FISH

  3. Find and read a general knowledge fishing book at the library and then books about specific types of fish you want to learn more about and how to fish for them. Most all baits, lures live and artificial will be covered along with knots, rigs, set-ups, rods, reels, presentations and productive waters. The more you learn and know the better off you will be in understanding when specific suggestions from other anglers are asked for and given.

  4. Well there are many different types of artificial lures. There are spoons, jigs, crankbaits, swimbaits, spinners, and many other ones. Most of your spoons, jigs, and spinners are just supposed to represent a wounded baitfish, while your swimbaits and crankbaits and topwater lures try to directly mimic one.

  5. Ask the man/woman behind the counter at the marina what the fish are biting on and make sure that you have at least two of this bait in you tackle box if it is indeed an artificial. When you buy the baits recommended, ask for a difinition of them. Buy a subscription of a magazine with related stories of the water you normally fish. If you can’t afford a subscription, check with your public library or ask the marina personnel the names of fishing clubs that use the marina on a regular basis and then check with them to see if they put out a monthly newsletter and and ask to be put on their mailing list. Finally, go to your local bait shop and look carefully at the artificials. They are easy to differentiate. The crank baits are for diving below the surface. The length of the ‘lip’ determines how deep they will dive. On very hot days and very calm water you will need a deep diver. There are spin baits or jigs. These baits usually have a long shank hook with a lead head painted like a fish with feathers or straw like material fastened around the hook and a spinning ‘spoon’ attached. You will want to experiment with different colors of plastic grubs when fishing these spin baits. Then there are the top waters such as a popper or a broken minnow. These baits are great very early in the morning when the mist is still on the water and late afternoon. These are times bass tend to feed on top of the water. Of course, if you find the bass feeding along the bank throw some plastic worms at them. Color choice depends on the water temp, clouds or no clouds, time of day, time of year, turpidity of the water, and the location. Pros will have 4 or 5 rod/reel combos with different color plastic worms so they spend less time changing baits and more time fishing. Last but not least are your rattle traps. I have fished Big Lake Sam Rayburn in Texas many times over the years with my husband. When the bass would hit absolutely nothing my husband threw at them I would catch a fish on the rattle trap. I kept a large assortment in my fresh water tackle box at all times. I hope this helps. Good luck and God bless you. Have a safe and successful time fishing.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>